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tiptrot.com February 19, 2018


Olympics: More Russians appeal Pyeongchang exclusion to CAS

07 February 2018, 01:16 | Susie Olson

Olympics: More Russians appeal Pyeongchang exclusion to CAS

02_05_Kim Yong Nam

A total of 168 Russian athletes will take part in the Olympics, although the Russian Olympic Committee initially applied for 500 athletes to take part in the Games to the IOC.

Matthieu Reeb, the Secretary General of The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), speaks during a press conference at the Main Press Centre of the PyeongChang Winter Olympic Games 2018, Pyeongchang county, South Korea, Feb 1, 2018.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport said it would likely hear the case Wednesday in Pyeongchang.

Last week, 28 Russians had life bans from the Olympics overturned by CAS, prompting 15 of them to apply to take part in Pyeongchang.

Six-time Olympic gold medalist Viktor Ahn and three former National Hockey League players are among 32 Russian athletes who filed appeals Tuesday seeking spots at the Pyeongchang Olympics.

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) on Monday declined a request to admit 13 more athletes and two coaches from Russian Federation to the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics.

After the CAS decision, Russia's Olympic Committee requested that 13 active athletes and two who had become coaches should be allowed to participate in the February 9-25 Games but the IOC has refused to extend invitations to them.

The IOC, however, has refused to invite them, noting there was evidence about the athletes that had not been available to the IOC commission that had investigated them.


The IOC called the CAS decision "extremely disappointing and surprising", adding that it will have a "very negative" impact on the global fight against doping.

As well as short-track speedskating legend Ahn, the 32 include world cross-country skiing champion Sergei Ustyugov and world biathlon champion Anton Shipulin.

This is despite a highly orchestrated plot culminating in Russia's hosting of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, where tainted samples were switched through a hole in the anti-doping laboratory's wall.

At a meeting in Pyeongchang on Tuesday, Pound said: "The IOC has not only failed to protect clean athletes but has made it possible for cheating athletes to prevail against the clean athletes".

"I'm sorry, but that is not an appropriate response by the IOC to a flagrant attack on the Olympic Games and on clean athletes by Russian Federation", he said. Our commitment to both is in serious doubt.

However, it appeared to be an unpopular opinion from Pound, who along with Britain's Adam Pengilly was the only delegate to abstain from an otherwise unanimous vote of confidence in the IOC's handling of the Russian suspension.

Bach is sure be grilled by the full International Olympic Committee membership about the decision to exclude many Russian athletes for the Games despite a ruling by the Court of Arbitration for Sport that overturned doping bans for many of them.

Russian telecom company RT cited head mentor Aleksey Chistyakov as saying on Monday that a training session had been hindered by the tests after they touched base in South Korea.



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